Vintage Ads: Gil Scott-Heron, ‘The First Minute Of A New Day’ (1975)

Gil Scott-Heron, ‘The First Minute Of A New Day’ (‘Cash Box’ magazine, February 01, 1975). Click to enlarge.


“Humanity itself is the subject and his artistry is capable of touching anyone who listens…”

Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson’s The First Minute of a New Day feature’s the politically-charged, beautiful tune “Winter In America.”

“And I see the robins – perched in barren treetops.
Watching last-ditch racists marching across the floor.
But just like the peace sign that vanished in our dreams.
Never had a chance to grow. Never had a chance to grow.

And now it’s winter – it’s winter in America.
And all of the healers have been killed – or betrayed.
Yeah, but the people know, people know…”

Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson: ‘Winter In America’ (1975)

(Image source: Cash Box via American Radio History)

Previously on Vintage Ads: Rose Royce, ‘Love Don’t Live Here Anymore’ (1979)

Video Playback: Kraftwerk On ‘Tomorrow’s World’ TV Show (1975)

Florian ‘V-2’ Schneider and Kraftwerk performing ‘Autobahn,’ 1975

Here’s a fascinating find. A brief, futuristic clip featuring Kraftwerk performing “Autobahn” on UK TV program Tomorrow’s World in 1975.

Tapping out a melody on early drum machines.

The original version of “Autobahn,” appearing on the album of the same name, runs for nearly 23 minutes. A three and a half minute cut down was released as a single and hit the top 40 in numerous countries including the US, UK, and Germany.

Hard to believe something this forward-thinking was recorded in 1974. Glimpse the future in the clip.

Kraftwerk: ‘Autobahn’ On UK TV ‘Tomorrow’s World’ (1975)

Previously on Video Playback: Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Movie Premiere News Report (1978)

Playback!: Bachman-Turner Overdrive, ‘Roll On Down The Highway’ (1975)

‘Let it roll!’

Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s “Roll On Down The Highway” appeared on the band’s Not Fragile L.P. in the fall of 1974.

The song, originally written for and rejected by Ford Motors, burned much rubber on its drive to #14 on the US Hot 100 and #4 in Canada. Watch the band performing on Germany’s Musik Laden in 1975 below.

Bachman-Turner Overdrive: ‘Roll On Down The Highway’ On ‘Musik Laden’ (1975)

Previously on Playback!: Rufus & Chaka Khan, ‘Once You Get Started’ (1975)

Music Makers Of The Seventies: Japan

Japan is always ‘In Vogue.’

Pre-punk/post-punk, new wave innovators, Japan, have been added to the Music Makers of the Seventies section.

Check into it now for an at-a-glance overview of David Sylvian and company’s 1970s career. Quiet lives lead to obscure alternatives – so, get cracking!

Vintage Ads: Rose Royce, ‘Love Don’t Live Here Anymore’ (1979)

Rose Royce, ‘Love Don’t Live Here Anymore’ (‘Radio & Records’ magazine, January 19, 1979). Click to enlarge.

Rose Royce’s “Love Don’t Live Here Anymore” originally appeared on the group’s Rose Royce III: Strikes Again! L.P. in August of 1978.

“Love Don’t Live Here Anymore” (written by Miles Gregory and produced by Norman Whitfield) hit #32 in the US charts. It fared even better around the globe, reaching #2 in the UK and New Zealand and #10 in Australia.

(Image source: Radio & Records via American Radio History)

Rose Royce: ‘Love Don’t Live Here Anymore’ (1978)

Previously on Vintage Ads: Kiss, ‘Shout It Out Loud’ (1977)

Playback!: Rufus & Chaka Khan, ‘Once You Get Started’ (1975)

‘C’mon and move – c’mon and groove…’

When Rufus and Chaka Khan get together you know something good is going to happen. Here they are on TopPop in 1975 performing “Once You Get Started.”

“Once You Get Started” (written by Gavin Christopher) originally appeared on the Rufusized L.P. in late 1974. The song climbed to #10 on the US Hot 100.

Rufus Featuring Chaka Khan: ‘Once You Get Started’ On ‘TopPop'(1975)

Previously on Playback!: Nick Lowe, ‘Cracking Up’ (1979)

Vintage Ads: Kiss, ‘Shout It Out Loud’ (1977)

Kiss, ‘Shout It Out Loud’ (‘Cash Box’ magazine, December 17, 1977). Click to enlarge.

Kiss originally released “Shout It Out Loud” as a single lifted from the Destroyer album in 1976. In December of 1977, the band let loose a live version of the tune from their Alive II L.P.

The original release of “Shout It Out Loud” made it to #31 on the US Hot 100 and went all the way to #1 in Canada. The live version didn’t fare quite as well, peaking at #54 in the US and #74 in Canada.

(Image source: Cash Box via American Radio History)

Previously on Vintage Ads: The Jacksons, ‘Enjoy Yourself’ (1976)

More Kiss at Cherry Stereo: Vintage Ads: Kiss, Casablanca Albums (1976)

Vintage Ads: The Jacksons, ‘Enjoy Yourself’ (1976)

The Jacksons, ‘Enjoy Yourself’ (‘Radio & Records’ magazine, December 17, 1976). Click to enlarge.

Time to “Enjoy Yourself” with The Jacksons. Catch a December 1976 print ad from Radio & Records above and a May 1977 performance on Germany’s Musik Laden below.

“Enjoy Yourself” was written by Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff and appeared on the November ’76 L.P., The Jacksons. The song joyfully climbed all the way to #6 on the US Hot 100.

The Jacksons: ‘Enjoy Yourself’ On Musik Laden, 1977

(Image source: Radio & Records via American Radio History)

Previously on Vintage Ads: David Naughton, ‘Makin’ It’ (1979)

Playback!: Nick Lowe, ‘Cracking Up’ (1979)

‘I don’t think it’s funny no more…’

Nick Lowe’s “Cracking Up” first appeared as a single in May of 1979 before joining the collection of fine tunes on Lowe’s Labour of Lust L.P. the following month.

In the official video on-tap below you’ll spy Dave Edmunds rockpilin’ the guitar. Have a great Friday the 13th!

Nick Lowe: ‘Cracking Up’ (1979)

Previously on Playback!: Rolling Stones, ‘Dead Flowers’ (Live, 1971)

Vintage Ads: David Naughton, ‘Makin’ It’ (1979)

David Naughton, ‘Makin’ It’ (‘Radio Report’ magazine, June 07, 1979). Click to enlarge.


“A song with astounding upper female demographics.”

Actor David Naughton released his one and only song, “Makin’ It,” in late 1978.

“Makin’ It” was the theme song for the TV series of the same name (it also appeared on the Meatballs movie soundtrack) and the upbeat disco foot-shuffler made it all the way to #5 on the US Hot 100.

David Naughton: ‘Makin’ It’ (1979)

(Image source: Radio Report via American Radio History)

Previously on Vintage Ads: Bo Diddley, ‘Husband-In-Law’ (1972)